Eid-ul-Fitr is a time to celebrate with friends and family, and pray that next year again we would be blessed enough to welcome Ramadan. While as grown ups, we have learned and understood the true meaning of fasting, and why Eid is such a festive day, kids still lack the comprehension. That of course comes with time.

Jeddah’s Eid:

Growing up in Jeddah, I remember my parents buying toys for not just us, but also the kids of our family friends, on Eid. The go-to place used to be Toy Land on Tahlia street.. remember Jeddawi kids of 80’s ? The wrapping paper, a white backdrop, populated with prime colored balloons, would be a source of joy to all of us younglings. The joy of opening the presents on Eid day, and later jetting off to Baskin Robbins, is how I remember the joy of Eid.

Lahore’s Eid:

Moving to Lahore, and entering teenage, the concept of Eidie was soon embraced! Eidie was any amount of cash, that our Khala, Taya, Nana Jaan, Phoppo would bestow on us. While still being a novice, we kids would often fall  prey to our parents’ promise ‘ghar ja kar lae leena’  and later be told; ‘hum nae bhi wapis karna hai’ (yeah yeah I know almost all of us relished that cash for a few hours before it went back into Eidie giving circulation ) 😉

Truth be told… I wished we had still received gifts..which couldn’t be returned …

Canada’s Eid:

Today, having 3 kids, I believe that toys for them are more than just a gift. The whole act of them waiting for Eid morning, to come back from Eid prayers, and to open up the goodies, is a whole another joy! Plus, I as a parent, enjoy searching for items which would surprise and please my kids.

Also, living in Canada, our children are so used to the idea of Christmas, that they need to understand that Eid is also a celebration. Of course, it is not only about the gifts, but it is a day of celebration.

The way we do gifts in our house:

  • A gift for as many Roza/ fasting that the child will observe. Of course we are talking about the chiri roza for the young ones.
  • A gift for praying namaz during Ramadan.
  • A gift for acts of kindness around the house. This included; helping with house chores and cleaning after themselves.

While the guidelines are there… my husband tends to buy toys that he is interested in, in the name of giving to the kids. Yes yes husband dear, I know why you bought the walkie-talkies and Dart guns. (What can I do? He is a kid also 😉 )

Now for the kind of gifts that we bought:

The gifts are not at all expensive. To give you an idea, some of the items are:

  • I bought  the girls Body Splashes from Bath & Body Works, which were on sale for under 5$.
  • I got a cushion with cover for my eldest, and a travel mug.
  • Keychains for the young ones to decorate their school bags. (apparently that is still in fashion)
  • And oh yes, as mentioned before, my hubby bought boy-toys in name of Eid gift too 😉

Arranging the gifts:

Considering the layout of our homes, I knew that my best option is to utilize the fireplace, as that is a focal point in the living room. No I did not consider putting up a tree! But I did take the liberty of bringing out items that depicted some form of Ramadan, or Arab, affiliation.

 

Finally, Eid is about coming togather as a family, and bounding to celebrate this aspucious day. Since Ramadan comes once a year, I feel doing gifts is not an expense or spoiling the kids.

So what are you doing at your home on this Eid? Let me know in comments below.

 

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